Restaurant Slammed By Atheists – Forced To Remove Churchgoer’s Sunday Discount [Video]

A seemingly harmless discount to parishioners who wanted a good meal after church backfired on an Ohio restaurant after a secular organization cried foul.

The owners of the Starters Cafe in Cheviot, Ohio, offered a 10-percent discount to those who presented that morning’s church bulletin at Sunday brunch, Fox News reported.

The cafe’s Facebook page has been removed, perhaps temporarily, while the new restaurant lets tensions die down.

Watson said there are at least seven churches within a mile of the restaurant and felt this would be an easy way to get more people in the door.

“We’ve had an outstanding response from the local community. There’s been a lot of support,” Watson said.

Watson, who opened the restaurant the first week of June, said the response was positive – at first.

“Nobody has said a word to me in any way, shape or form. So, as far as you know, thinking that that was any type of discriminatory act or anything offensive to anybody seemed completely absurd to me,” Watson said.

As Reported By WKRC:

“Nobody has said a word to me in any way, shape or form. So, as far as you know, thinking that that was any type of discriminatory act or anything offensive to anybody seemed completely absurd to me,” Watson said.

“I realized there may actually be legal repercussions for this. So, in the end I ultimately recanting the offer and also issuing an apology to the lady,” Watson said.

Watson said he’s not trying to push religion on anyone. He said he went to church as a kid but not anymore.

“My busiest day of the week is Sunday, so, in my line of work, I’m not an incredibly religious person. It was just an attempt to drum up some business for my new business,” Watson said.

Watson said the woman accepted his apology and the negative review has been removed from Yelp.

“We are shocked that there is such little understanding of the Civil Rights Act and that there could be this kind of confusion naivete that you can reward some customers for their religious beliefs and penalize others,” Annie Laurie Gaylor, the co-president of the Freedom From Religion Foundation said.

 

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